Speaking Topics

Topics:

Transformative Technologies in Health Care - Moving from tech, to application of tech, to improve patient outcomes.

The future is the sensor - The power of realtime insight generation is everywhere, all the time.

IP means nothing - How challenging the notion of patents while rethinking the need and value of protecting Intellectual Property will save our modern economy from ourselves.

Clinics Rising - Comparing challenging stories in global health care and showing how you can help.

Simulation in health care and education - Creating an “I want to” instead of an “I have to” curriculum with immersive experiences and simulations.

Contact me for more information.

My Kindle & Book List
  • Kluge: The Haphazard Evolution of the Human Mind
    Kluge: The Haphazard Evolution of the Human Mind
    by Gary Marcus
  • What Is the What (Vintage)
    What Is the What (Vintage)
    by Dave Eggers
  • The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd edition
    The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd edition
    by Edward R. Tufte
  • BRAND sense: Sensory Secrets Behind the Stuff We Buy
    BRAND sense: Sensory Secrets Behind the Stuff We Buy
    by Martin Lindstrom
  • Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation
    Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation
    by Tim Brown
  • The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive Advantage
    The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive Advantage
    by Roger L. Martin
  • Tao Te Ching: A New English Version (Perennial Classics)
    Tao Te Ching: A New English Version (Perennial Classics)
    by Lao Tzu
  • Why Hospitals Should Fly: The Ultimate Flight Plan to Patient Safety and Quality Care
    Why Hospitals Should Fly: The Ultimate Flight Plan to Patient Safety and Quality Care
    by John J. Nance

Objects

This is a collection of the objects I love. Some I own, some I will, and some I have lost. Most are from a time now past yet still hold a place in todays world of over valued and under delivered goods.

Entries in airplane (1)

Tuesday
Jan122010

Mooney Acclaim S Aircraft

The new Acclaim S (for speed) is the fastest production single engine airplane available. With a cruising airspeed of 242 knots (278 MPH) you get where you need to go fast. The airplane’s big Continental TSIO-550G engine features twin turbos and dual intercoolers; it thrums happily in the cold, high sky @ 25,000 feet above seal-level (about five miles over the ocean).

Loaded up with AV 100LL and two big pilots up front, the airplane is nearly at gross weight as it gradually sneaks up on its max cruise number. I watch the true airspeed readout on the Garmin G1000, and the numbers slowly count up to 239 knots. That’s 275 mph in nonpilot speak, about four times legal freeway speeds and faster even than a Bugatti Veyron. Normally, 239 knots is the beginning of turbine country, recorded by C90 King Airs and the like, but the fastest of the Mooneys takes truly high cruise in stride.

Speed has always been Mooney’s strongest suit. The type has consistently manifested among the highest knot count per hp in general aviation. In today’s world of $6-per-gallon avgas, the airplane’s ability to wring every possible knot out of each gallon serves it well. The gold standard of performance was previously one mph per hp, and a Mooney is one of very few production airplanes to realize that goal (achieved 30 years ago on the 201, flying 200 mph on 200 hp). Better still, the turbocharged Mooney 231 came close to realizing one knot per horsepower in 1979, delivering more than 200 knots on only 210 hp.

The first aircraft produced by the new Mooney company was the small, single-seat, Mooney Mite M-18. It was designed to appeal to the thousands of fighter pilots leaving military service (some thought the Mooney Mite looked so much like the Messerschmitt Bf 109 that they called it the "Texas Messerschmitt".

The Mooney Mite established some of the design concepts that are still used by Mooney today. The model Mooney M20 entered production in 1955 and outwardly looked like a scaled-up Mite. Mooney is still producing variants of the M20 today.

Modern Mooneys are know for being fast and nimble and have that distinctive aggressively forward pitched rudder.